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March 23, 2012

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Kelli,

There IS still one Midrin equivalent medication available without going the compounding route. It's from Macoven Pharmaceutical in Magnolia, Texas.

Teri

Kelli Smith

Thanks so much Teri... if anyone needs it for their pharmacy, here is the contact info on the Macoven Pharmaceutical website:
Phone: 877-622-6836
Fax: 225-647-6798
Email: customerservice@macovenpharma.com

Also... thanks so much to Teri, who has been closely following the Midrin issue and has a great resource of information if you want to understand why/how this situation occurred with a drug that's been around for so long and helped so many people with their migraines.

You can visit Teri's site here:
http://www.helpforheadaches.com/articles/2010/Discontinued-Migraine-Medications.htm

Or see her articles on Health Central
http://www.healthcentral.com/migraine/c/123/130286/migraine-epidrin-1

John Voliva, R.Ph.

Teri and Kelli – thanks for this additional info.  You're quite right: Macoven is producing an equivalent medication, but the production volume is such that there are still several regions of the country where this drug is unattainable.  Also, Macoven's product is not listed in the FDA's official database and thus, some pharmacy wholesalers are wary to carry it. In the past year, we have received calls from hundreds of pharmacists that reported inability to procure Midrin equivalents and wanted to know about a compounding solution.  

The bottom line, for us, is that we want migraine sufferers to have access to the most effective relief for them… in whatever form that comes.  Even before Midrin was discontinued in 2009, we were compounding these active ingredients into dosage forms that were either easier to administer, or in a specific strength needed by certain patients.  If future regulatory issues should ever cause other Midrin equivalents to be discontinued, compounding could continue to be a solution.

Thanks,

John Voliva, R.Ph.

Kelli Smith

Thanks John. I agree. I know everyone who gets relief from Midrin (or Midrin alternatives) will very much appreciate having multiple options for supply going into the future. I can't imagine the anxiety it must be causing so many people to think they have a medicine that's working, and may not be able to get it. Very frustrating.

If you happen to see this comment... I would love to ask you a compounding question. I haven't taken Midrin since I was in my 20s... it stopped working for me... but I'm 42 now and have had excellent luck with Imitrex/sumatriptan since it first came out. I do have migraines nothing seems to touch, but I'd say I can get quick relief about 50% of the time. When Treximet came out, that was even more effective for me. I generally take a triptan with a hydrocodone, and the combination has been working well for me for 10+ years (maybe even 15 now).

My insurance changed a couple years ago and the they stopped offering a reasonable co-pay for brand drugs... so I could no longer get Treximet. So, what I started doing was just getting generic sumatriptan, naproxen sodium, and hydrocodone and taking the 3 together. It works great. I'm just curious... would there be any good reason (price/effectiveness) to attempt to compound those three drugs into a single pill... or is the point of doing that mainly for brand drug combinations that are difficult to find (or get a personalized dosage)? I don't know much about compounding other than that I did a testosterone cream for awhile to see if that might help my migraines (my levels were quite low and I also have trouble with my weight, so we were trying it out). It did seem to help, but then my insurance refused to cover the cost of the tests I needed to check my levels regularly... of course.

So, if you have any thoughts, I'd be interested to see if compounding the medicines that work so well for me is something I should look into?
Thanks, Kelli :)

Percysowner

Warning! I went to refill my Macoven Midrin Friday. The pharmacist didn't have the full prescription and told me I could pick up the remainder today. When I went in, they told me that the manufacturer said it was not available at this time. So it may be wise to start trying to get refills before it goes off the market again.

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